Equity and Inclusion

TJCOG is committed to the goal of advancing racial equity and inclusion within our organization and across our seven-county region in order to dismantle structural racism and ensure a more equitable future for all. As a government organization with great influence on public decision-making, TJCOG has a responsibility to identify and address racial inequities that exist.

We hold ourselves accountable to this commitment through continuous education for ourselves and our members, the incorporation of foundations of equity and inclusion into our policies and programs, and transparent and data-driven communication. 

What has TJCOG done so far?
  • Defined our Core Values to incorporate a lens of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion.

  • Held the 2020 Regional Summit focused on Equity and Local Government.

  • Joined the Government Alliance on Race & Equity, a national network of government agencies working to achieve racial equity and advance opportunities for all that allows our employees to access peer learning, tools, and self-reflection to improve their understanding of racial equity in government work.

  • Engaged Tru Pettigrew with TruAccess to lead a set of facilitated Courageous Conversations on Race Relations for our staff to have a safe space for dialogue on race.

  • Offered internal opportunities for reflection and education, first through a book club reading the Color of Law.

Why racial equity and inclusion matters?

1. Our Region is Growing

Between July 1, 2018 and 2019, our region experienced an increase of 36,129 residents. This is 34% of the total population growth in the state.

2. Our Region is Growing... More Diverse.

 3. Our Economy is Benefiting Some Exponentially More Than Others

Black and Latino workers earn a much lower hourly wage than White and Asian/Pacific Islander workers (see right).

While our region has added new jobs and industries, income growth remains dramatically unequal for the poorest and richest households. 

  • Raleigh Metropolitan Statistical Area (1980-2017): While the bottom 20th percentile average household income increased by $3,017, from $27,010 to $30,027, the top 95th percentile average household income increased by $87,694, from $156,374 to $244,068.
  • Durham Metropolitan Statistical Area (1980-2017): While the bottom 20th percentile average household income increased by $1,694, from $22,638 to $24,332, the top 95th percentile average household income increased by $109,483 from $146,582 to $256,065.
What are other member governments in our region doing?